ICGCM Papers:
Subsidence and Slope Stability
 
 
Subsidence and Ground Deformation Prediction in North America—A Case Study and New Method Developments
35th International Conference on Ground Control in Mining
Subsidence and Ground Deformation Prediction in North America—A Case Study and New Method Developments
by
Karsten Zimmermann, DMT GmbH & Co. KG, Essen, GermanyPeter Cain, DMT Geosciences Ltd., Calgary, Canada
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[Conference] 35th International Conference on Ground Control in Mining
[Price] Free  [Comments] 0
[Topical Area] Subsidence and Slope Stability
[Author] Karsten Zimmermann, DMT GmbH & Co. KG, Essen, GermanyPeter Cain, DMT Geosciences Ltd., Calgary, Canada
[Abstract] 
Key Conclusions:
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The applicability of the prediction method and its enhancements concerning terrain information is demonstrated.
Key Findings:
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The analysis was successfully conducted and included information about mining and geology covering more than 80 longwall operations in 5 coal seams and extensive visualization of the calculated effects at surface for more than 200,000 points (40 km2 DEM). Total final subsidence of more than 10 m in some parts of the influence area have been predicted. Gathered information is shown to be essentially for influence prediction on local streams and mud areas and key for planning mitigation measures.
Objective of the Paper:
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The prediction was conducted by DMT using the computer program SPS 4D based on the Ruhrkohle method. The article briefly presents the Ruhrkohle method and other models of subsidence prediction applied in international mining. Based on the case study, benefits of the Ruhrkohle method and possibilities for its international application will be explained. Information gathered from literature studies on subsidence in North America were incorporated for the initial model parameterization. The article shows in which way the observed influences of mountainous topography on surface displacements and deformations can be considered by an extension of the subsidence prediction model (integration of DEM information).
Problem Statement:
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For regulatory approval of a new coal mine in North America extensive investigations on feasibility and environmental impact are required. The cumulative mined coal thickness of 22 m in some areas of the multi-seam longwall operation requires a comprehensive forecast of expected ground movements and subsidence impact (subsidence, slope, displacement, curvature and strain).