ICGCM Papers:
Syd S. Peng Award Speakers
 
 
Applications of ARMPS (version 6) to Practical Pillar Design Problems
30th International Conference on Ground Control in Mining
Applications of ARMPS (version 6) to Practical Pillar Design Problems
by
Christopher Mark, USdol - MSHA, Pittsburgh, United StatesMichael GaunaJoseph CybulskiGeorge Karabin, MSHA, Pittsburgh, United States
Download PDF Add to My Library
Author's Presentation PPT
[Conference] 30th International Conference on Ground Control in Mining
[Price] Free  [Comments] 0
[Topical Area] Syd S. Peng Award Speakers
[Author] Christopher Mark, USdol - MSHA, Pittsburgh, United StatesMichael GaunaJoseph CybulskiGeorge Karabin, MSHA, Pittsburgh, United States
[Abstract] Applications of ARMPS (version 6) to Practical Pillar Design Problems

Christopher Mark, Ph.D., P.E., Principal Roof Control Specialist
MSHA, Safety Division, Coal Mine Safety and Health
Pittsburgh, PA

Michael Gauna, Mining Engineer
Joseph Cybulski, Chief
George Karabin, Supervisory Civil Engineer (Retired)
MSHA, Roof Control Division (RCD), Pittsburgh Safety and Health Technology Center
Pittsburgh, PA


Abstract

The Analysis of Retreat Mining Pillar Stability (ARMPS) program has been used to evaluate room and pillar retreat mining layouts since it was first released in the mid 1990’s. After the Crandall Canyon mine disaster focused attention on the importance of pillar design, ARMPS became an essential component for the Roof Control Plans developed by mine operators. In 2010, NIOSH released ARMPS version 6, which features a “pressure arch” loading model for deep cover room and pillar mining. NIOSH has also provided general guidance for using ARMPS, including design criteria based on statistical analyses of an extensive case history data base.

Many real-world retreat mining scenarios entail mining configurations that ARMPS does not directly address. Some of these situations that the MSHA Roof Control Division (RCD) has encountered in the course of its reviews of more than 100 “complex and non-typical” plans are:

• Unmined pillars are left at the mouth of a retreat panel to serve as a “composite barrier pillar”
• The floor is extracted on retreat, increasing the mining height
• More than one row of bleeder pillars is left in an adjacent, previously mined panel
• A retreat panel is located above or below a gob area in a previously mined seam
• Bleeder pillars are partially extracted on retreat

RCD has developed solutions that allow these situations to be fitted into the ARMPS framework, and these are presented in this paper. Also discussed are some of the rules of thumb that have been developed for various input parameters such as the treatment of in-seam rock and slab cuts into solid coal.